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Preferred long range caliber

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  • Preferred long range caliber

    Was wondering what your favorite long range calibers are and why. Looking to get a new rifle soon, will be shooting 1000+ yards. Thanks!

  • #2
    I like to go with the 0.020 caliber rule. By going in calibers that vary 0.020, you are able to work with the majority of weights and best B.C. bullet offerings available. For example 22-250, 243, 6.5-284, 7mm, 300, 338. So if it were me, I would look closely at what I currently have and look towards the next caliber that lines up with the goals you are trying to achieve!

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    • #3
      Thanks Bob!

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      • #4
        The short version is it all depends on what you're going to do with it. Long range benchrest, long range hunting and long range steel shooting are all similar but different. While a heavy caliber such as a .338 Lapua could work for all of them, it has it's pros and cons just as a much smaller .243 Winchester would have pros and cons.

        If hunting is not a part of your equation, some of your 6mm and 6.5mm calibers work quite nice as they are pleasant to shoot all day long. If going after animals is your game, you need to consider what distances you might go for, which animals and if the caliber has the capability of making a clean and ethical kill.

        I personally have a 6.5 Creedmoor for an all-around long range play gun on steel and paper. It's easy to shoot with little recoil, cuts the wind nicely, and decently priced ammo and components are not hard to find. Also, it will work within the practical distances for east coast species of game. It also works quite well on prairie dogs...

        All that being said, you have to choose what will work best for your needs.
        Attached Files
        Last edited by Sean @ Nightforce; 07-29-2014, 07:49 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bob Beck View Post
          I like to go with the 0.020 caliber rule. By going in calibers that vary 0.020, you are able to work with the majority of weights and best B.C. bullet offerings available. For example 22-250, 243, 6.5-284, 7mm, 300, 338. So if it were me, I would look closely at what I currently have and look towards the next caliber that lines up with the goals you are trying to achieve!
          I wish that I would have seen this about 10 years ago! Better late than never I guess. I have several of those covered at present but there is always room for a few more!

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          • #6
            Thanks for all the input! Looks like I have some tough but very good decisions to make!

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            • #7
              Ok, So let's compare a 338 Edge to a 300 Ultra Mag. One shooting a 300 grain Berger vs 230 Berger. What are you gaining vs what are you giving up. This would be for a hunting rifle and some long range targets.

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              • #8
                I have been trying to nail down a caliber and gun myself. I currently have a .270 WSM that shoots pretty well. 500 is the farthest i've shot due to it being difficult to find places to shoot over that. I want to start shooting longer distances. I elk hunt in south colorado once a year and have taken elk at 350-505 yards. I would like a custom rifle with a scope with adjustable turrets. Im learning that the 7mm is a choice caliber for long distance. I like my 270 WSM cause it work for me for deer and elk. My current top choice would be a 7mm WSM with a Nightforce MOA 1000 scope and a G7 rangefinder.

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                • #9
                  I would think of it in terms of energy. Most say you need 1000 ish foot pounds of energy to kill an elk, look at max effective range and energy at that range, keeping in mind hunter ethics. Just because we can shoot rifles to beyond 2000 yards or more, does not mean we should. That being said, I just had an 338/300 built on left hand control round feed repeater action in Arizona and I am currently pushing 300 bergers to 3265 fps with reloader 33. Piercision stock with NF. It has been polished since this pic and stock has 12 coats of clear that has been wet sanded. Barrel is 32.5" cut rifled from CBW in Prescott. Although, we only hunt with handguns or sticks and strings. Good luck and remember energy comes with recoil.

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                  • #10
                    I agree with Sean, depending what you want to do. If you just want to shoot paper, metal targets, plastic jugs, baloons and varmints at long range, the 6mm and 6.5mm calibers are great. I have a 6mmAI and 6.5x284 for longer shots. They have great BCs and do not punish your shoulder and ears to shoot them.

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